The Flash: The Fastest Show on TV Returns

The Flash on Television 

The scarlet speedster has made it to live action television for the second time. And it looks as though he has legs in the new brave world of small screen super heroics.

FLASH. THE FASTEST MAN ALIVE. WHEN IT COMES TO NOT SO SECRET ORIGINS, IT WAS THE JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA THAT ALLOWED THE FLASH TO CREEP UP ON ME. In particular, as part of Grant Morrison’s sublime roster of the retooled Justice League of America almost two decades ago. But earlier in the ‘90s I probably claimed, and probably still have, a record for the most Blockbuster rentals of the 1990 Flash TV series.

That wasn’t all of its first and only season of course – it was well before the ‘Time of the Box Set’. That single VHS may well have been a TV movie pulled from multiple episodes, probably a pilot, but I distinctly remember Mark Hamill’s Trickster appearing which would place it in the latter half of costumed campery.

Flash Transmission

A particular highlight was the incredible Flash suit“

The Flash was in many ways a ridiculous show, costing $1.6million an episode, riding on the coat-tails of Batman’s big screen breakthrough the year before and like that film nicking Danny Elfman for the score. History has been unkind. For all the missteps in its superhero antics and struggles with the special effects of the time (really, not that bad), it was an important rung on the ladder that’s brought us the complex string of comic book movies on the small and big screens today. A particular highlight was the incredible Flash suit designed by Stan Winston Studios. Sculpted and deep scarlet, it certainly looked the part – in fact remains the best representation on screen, if a little impractical and perhaps in hindsight, a little The Tick. Read more…

Doctor Who: Celebrity Histories – “I’m Going to be King. Run!” (Whovember #10 Omega)

Tenth Doctor and his Zygon 

New Whovember continues. The second of two Tenth Doctor retrospectives looking at the strangely linked world of his celebrity historicals. As the knocks tolled for this Doctor it was clear that he still had a thing for Royals. But would we ever find out what?

IN THE FIRST PART OF THIS RETROSPECTIVE WE VISITED THE SECOND AND THIRD SERIES OF NEW WHO – TACKLING WEREWOLVES, FIREPLACES AND BARDS. When Martha left, halfway through the Tenth’s chronological tour of duty, there was no way that trips to the celebrated past would leave with her. Series Four presented two historic adventures, both with celebrities of sorts and both landing in the top half of that year’s most viewed. While they proved to be excellent farewells to the Russell T Davies era of historical adventures but they left some plot strands… Although the Eleventh Doctor may have upped the stakes with Marilyn Monroe and River Song, the riddle of Queen Bess was asking for a conclusion.  And what better time than the Doctor’s Golden anniversary?

In this installment a look at:

A mixed bag of Fire, Myth and gold.  But are there any other patterns? “No, no, don’t do that…”

The Fires of Pompeii (Series Four, 2008)

Capaldi isn’t alone…

Series four still sticks out in the run of New Who. It’s resplendent, with only Series Eight matching its appearance. The fifth series would take a strange decision to mute the colour palette and it would take some time to return to this sheer variety. Companion-wise, initial disappointment that Donna reneged on her excellent choice not to join the Doctor gives way to undoubtedly the best character development seen in the show. And yet, it never quite hits the high-points of Series 3 despite serving up two celebrity histories.

Again, The Fires of Pompeii ramps up the production quality with astonishing set design thanks to BBC co-production Rome. Ancient Rome on Doctor Who once again, except it isn’t – it’s Pompeii and “it’s volcano Day”. Once again this is the first main trip for the Doctor’s companion and a rough ride of conscience and choice awaits. It may be the weakest grasp at celebrity, but its warranted. Lucius Caecilius Lucundus’s house still stands in Pompeii. And with the actor portraying him latterly rising to the rank of Time Lord it’s got to be a cert. Capaldi isn’t alone, sitting in a fine cast that also features Phil Davis, Phil Cornwall and Phil ‘The Power of Kroll’ Taylor. I might have made one of those up. Read more…

Doctor Who: Celebrity Histories – “Stepped through in either direction” (Whovember #10 Alpha)

Tenth Doctor and his future 

New Whovember continues with the first of two Tenth Doctor retrospectives. To begin, the strangely linked world of celebrity historical that prove, if nothing else, that there are few people the Tenth Doctor likes to hang around with more than Royals.

IT’S NOT EASY TO FORGET THAT THE DOCTOR’S FIRST ADVENTURE TOOK HIM BACK TO THE DAWN OF HUMANITY, BUT THERE’S BEEN A LOT OF TIME VORTEX UNDER THE BRIDGE SINCE THEN.  When it returned in 2005 the new series established a formula it’s virtually kept to of kicking off each series in the present day, then speeding forward in time before dipping back into the past for the third episode. While purely historical adventures may not have existed in the show since the early-1980s, the successful return has shown that they remain a crucial part of the show.  Indeed, few things sum up the Russell T Davies era of New Who like the celebrity history. And as the longest serving Doctor of both Davies’ tenure and New Who it seemed natural to look at the Tenth Doctor’s brushes with the celebrity shoulders of times past…

In this installment a look at:

Broadly, if you’re not royalty of the writing or properly regal kind you’ll have trouble getting in. Things have changed considerably since the Seventh Doctor couldn’t quite place Queen Elizabeth II’s face in Silver Nemesis. But are there any other patterns? “No, no, don’t do that…”

Tooth and Claw (Series Two, 2006)

A Victorian household named Torchwood

Tooth and Claw unmistakably kicks off in the Highlands. The setting for the Second Doctor adventure The Highlanders, where it was ably doubled by Surrey. Here it’s Merthyr’s turn to stand in for the timeless landscape. Timeless that is until… Slow-mo kung fu monks appear to commandeer a Victorian household named Torchwood. It’s a strange but thrilling start to the Tenth Doctor’s first historical, climaxing in a classic cage reveal pre-title cliff-hanger. The clue to cage’s the inhabitant is in the title you know…

Set loose from introducing this incarnation, Davies shows a playful and confident hand. Ian Drury makes an unexpected but welcome appearance aboard a TARDIS heading for 1970s Sheffield while Rose calls the Doctor a big old punk. But amid the fun of a vortex crash and the Doctor’s astute use of his Rhythm Stick, they end up in 1879. The Tenth Doctor’s first historical makes more than a nod to the Second Doctor’s 1966 Scottish outing – the last completely historical serial of any real length – when the Doctor introduces himself as Dr James McCrimmon. That takes in the PhD the Second Doctor once established that he’d earned and as a cover it gives David Tennant the chance to use his own accent (and then when Rose matches him, start the “Don’t do that” trope that will become very familiar). It’s fun but it’s also a sign that things are about to become a little too coincidental. The auspicious bump into Queen Victoria send the TARDIS crew into a tale of werewolves, long laid plans of revenge and assassination set mostly on the Torchwood Estate. Read more…

The Leftovers: The First Season Left Behind

The Leftovers - A Jokerslice 

As the finale of The Leftovers comes to UK screens, a Jokerslice in praise of a series that broke expectation to be something quite more than the sum of its parts… And its forebears. Includes ‘Leftover’ Spoilers throughout and up to the end of the first season.

 WHILE WE’RE DELUGED WITH SUPERHERO TELEVISION SERIES, NONE PERFECT, MANY PROMISING, IT’S EASY TO FORGET WHEN THE PEAK OF GENRE TELEVISION ARCS HIT LAST DECADE. Lost was possibly the prime example, FlashForward the wasted high-level duplicate late in the game, drawing on a literary source to capture the zeitgeist while failing to avoid repetition. Currently, The Dome and its ilk are the distilled versions, leaning far more on literary roots, for instance Stephen King, while never becoming truly mystifying. And frankly, there are too many others to mention. With the 2010s came fully formed fantasy television, long removed from space and star ships, which remained resolutely terrestrial – whether that’s comics, fairytales or Alcatraz. Even the Whedonverse slowly retreated more and more to Earth, at the cost of the supernatural. Over the last 14 years, Lost may signify a high-budget transition, but its legacy remains.


When it comes to comic books, arcs are innate. Despite the continuity issues that come with multiple creators, Marvel Comics have ostensibly told a continuous storyline for at five decades (at least). Very much attempting to form their own mythology there’s little in comparison to these New Gods, certainly in the modern age. This ‘Fall’ season, shows like Constantine and The Flash are pulling and reinterpreting plot strands from their comic roots while Gotham draws on the strength and weakness of expectation; exploring broadly unknown territory pre-Batman, with the choice to either fulfil or destroy the inevitable. The trick with that show, a rather curious mix of pantomime and deadpan procedural, is not to speculate about characters too much.

Read more…

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