Blur: 12 of the best post-Britpop

Blur Post-Britpop - Coffee and TV

A year ago Jokerside celebrated the 20th anniversary of Parklife with a terrible commemorative re-writing of THAT song. Now, nearly 20 years after Blur made their Britpop swansong, 12 years after their last album, they return with their fourth ‘-post’ effort. So, now they’re undeniably less of a Britpop band then they were, what have they really done in the intervening two decades?

IT’S ALMOST 20 YEARS SINCE THEIR LAST BRITPOP RELEASE, ABOUT 16 SINCE THEIR LAST ALBUM AS A FOURPIECE, BUT BLUR HAVE STILL MANAGED TO PACK A BIT IN. THREE SEMINAL ALBUMS IN FACT. The game changing eponymous album released less than two years after The Great Escape, the mystical and Gorillaz unleashing 13 and then, with a four year gap and one of the four departed, the soft oddity Think Tank. Post-Britpop Blur may not have been quite as consistent as during the first four albums, but with the eighth out today it’s clear that the turbulence saw them produce some of their greatest tracks.

If there’s an adage that’s come out of The Magic Whip coverage it’s that the older the Blur album, the more you can write about it. Or perhaps, the more you need to write about it. That’s partly down to the fact that every paragraph has to begin with variations of “Jettisoning” ‘Abandoning” and “Dispensing” alongside “Britpop persona”. But now, 15 years into the 21st century, Blur have definitely tipped the balance. And fundamentally Think Tank is far more interesting than Parklife. Blur’s canvas has massively enhanced with each difficult and different album. And it’s not as simple as third person stereotypes making way for first person observation or losing their guitarist. Much of the time Blur’s music remains remarkably consistent, just interpreted and broadened by high production at different times and different places, and crucially by increasingly more accomplished and motivated musicians (People. Of. The. World). As a result Lonesome Road, the third single from The Magic Whip, can merrily sit side to side with 1993’s For Tomorrow as not only an unmistakable Blur song but a fine companion piece.

But before the new album, here’s a look at 12 Blur tracks that came after they “Removed themselves from Britpop”. Not the 12 best, but 12 of the best from the last 19 years that tell a story of one of Britain’s finest bands. Read more…

Thunderbirds: Are… Really… Early… Go!

Thunderbirds Are Go

Easter weekend, 10 Easters on from Doctor Who… ITV played another 1960s card. But has it proved to be a Hood-like ruse?

BRITISH TELEVISION’S HAD A TOUGH DECADE STRUGGLING TO REPEAT DOCTOR WHO’S TREMENDOUS SUCCESS. That show didn’t have a Vortex-given right to reclaim its Saturday family crowd, let alone continually prove through its continued and growing popularity and proof that weekend evenings could sustain drama. It’s not mean feat, and in the 10 years that have passed since 2005’s Rose only Merlin has come close, after Robin Hood had first fizzled in BBC One’s evening slot. ITV had worse of it, with Primeval trying hard, only to face extinction within five staggered years, while Demons failed miserably in one. And to make things worse, Who’s wake wasn’t limited to Saturday evenings. It immediately triggered a fresh torrent of new fantasy and science-fiction to British television across many timeslots, from Being Human to In the Flesh to the rather unfortunate Outcasts.

But in April 2015, as Atlantis reaches its solemn final half-season, times are quite different from those deadly mid-zeroes. Who remains at a sublime peak of course, alive and urgent as ever, with the rather woolly and pointless promise of another five years recently made. Unfortunately and crucially such a promise may have some weight, as the BBC is in far different shape than it was a decade ago. Although its budget didn’t rival that afforded an equivalent American 45 minutes at the time, Doctor Who’s return was a risky and considerable investment that could only have been made by a rather flush and secure organization. The same is true of its diminutive online precursor and canon-mate, the 40th anniversary webcast Scream of the Shalka, an outrageous undertaking for a website at any time. Ten years on, scandal, mishandles, poor defences, resignations and a right-leaning government mean the present day BBC most likely couldn’t consider either of those things.

Five Years

That five year promise may have a hidden truth, and Whovians should be ready for a very different BBC come 2020. Fellow mega-brand Top Gear’s plight might have a slight impact, as will the spilling out of BBC Studios and the success of BBC Worldwide. It’s likely that a form of license fee will remain in five years, but it may be as radically different as the UK’s state broadcaster is herself at the end of the next parliament. All things considered, it can’t be dismissed that the Doctor Who brand could be sold for a pretty psychic penny…

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