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The Dark Knight at 10: 10 ways it Introduced a Little Anarchy

Dark Knight at 10 - the Joker Card

Batman The Dark Knight at 10

“Why so Serious?”

Heath Ledger’s Joker, disappearing pencils, Harvey’s lucky coin, love triangles, Batpods and a Caped Crusader having to cross the line. Cinema’s greatest comic book adaptation was released 10 years ago.

It’s a decade since the majestic centre point of Chris Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy simultaneously elevated the perception of what comic book films could be on film and set a tone, whether resisted or followed, for a genre making its way to the top of the box office.

Perhaps it’s no coincidence that the year of The Dark Knight’s release also saw the launch of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, imperceptibly starting on its own journey to redefine Hollywood blockbusters. That behemoth began rather inauspiciously with the double-bill of an unstoppable force of chaos and a super crime fighting multi-millionaire playboy. Although there was little appreciation that the billion dollar box office barrier The Dark Knight smashed through would soon become de rigueur for the flagship films of DC’s great rivals.

Nolan’s vision soon proved to be definitive to the point of irony in the fast-growing comic book genre.

A decade on, The Dark Knight stands tall as Batman’s finest celluloid hour. That’s saying something for a film that’s part of a rigid, isolationist trilogy and for a character whose live action pedigree stretches across multiple iterations and 70 years. Nolan’s vision soon proved to be definitive to the point of irony in the fast-growing comic book genre. The trilogy was an impossible springboard for an expanded film universe, but it set the tone under the light guiding hand of Chris Nolan for the difficult DC Extended Universe that followed in the past decade.

The Dark Knight wasn’t the first comic book film that strove for a level of realism or ‘darkness’, but it’s effect was immediate. Given the successful but unfashionable steps to colour that DC’s big hitters Superman and Batman had taken in the 1960s and 1970s, in the 21st century their incarnations would be set by The Dark Knight. The DCEU that duly emerged half a decade later was dark, gloomy, robust, powerful and hard-hitting. This was the universe of gods, eager to set a strong and lofty tone that comic pages could translate to screen. It now seems odd now that this sprang from the grounded and gritty Dark Knight trilogy as much as Nolan’s film’s became a watchword for darkness (read ‘not kids films’) without being mired in it, unlike Batman versus Superman or Man of Steel.

There have been few disasters in the DC films that followed. 2011’s Green Lantern may be the true exception, although that came mid-Dark Knight trilogy. But there have been plenty of disappointments, a far cry from the heights of The Dark Knight and The Dark Knight Rises. The impact of Nolan’s trilogy on the DCEU is still difficult to call. On the anniversary of The Dark Knight’s release this weekend, Warner Brothers premiered trailers at San Diego Comic Con for two new DC films that broke their so-called dark curse: Shazam and Aquaman. Alongside those was an early glimpse at the New Romantic-set sequel to one of last year’s great comic film successes, Wonder Woman.

Wonder Woman may have felt like a fresh slice of quality amid other major DC output from the last few years, but it’s storytelling style, reach and multiple levels owed much to Nolan’s trilogy, proving that Batman’s greatest celluloid moment, has a legacy as complex as its narrative.

To celebrate the modern comic classic, Jokerside presents 10 ways The Dark Knight broke the mold and unexpectedly gave us one of the most influential films of all time.

Dark Knight at 10 - Batman

1. It’s extraordinarily faithful

“I think you and I are destined to do this forever”

A struggle with origins have long dragged down the comic book medium, and the rot set into Batman’s modern film existence as soon as Tim Burton’s 1989 classic let a rather homicidal Dark Knight avenge his parents’ death. 2005’s Batman Begins made its more mature intent clear: there were no easy answers, and the crux lay in the battered tussle between Bruce Wayne and Batman.

It was a broad canvas ready to be explored in the sequel, but what was extraordinary was Nolan’s faithfulness to the source material. Joker was no stranger to public consciousness, but his film credentials were tied up in Jack Nicholson’s definitive 1980s take. The rather obvious idea of directly translating many great and classic storylines from the pages of comic books has only settled in over the past decade. After Begins Nolan had his sights set on the very beginning of Batman’s much explored and interpreted nemesis, and adapting an origin lost over decades of character development.

In the run-up to the film, eyebrows raised at Nolan’s assertion that his Joker would follow the character’s original 1940 comic book appearance. But there it is. The chillingly cool opening bank robbery, albeit to a different end, shows the same effective big dollar robber. Working alone for the most part, this Joker is quite at home with physical altercation, even if he doesn’t quite match his early comic book counterpart who could best Batman in a scrap. He comes from nowhere, with no identity but an intelligence to match the otherworldly comic horror of his appearance. And just as in Batman #1 the Joker issues warnings before commiting crimes. Now in a different medium, and not so clearly because he’s obsessed with his own brilliance, he still remains a man of his word. Continue reading “The Dark Knight at 10: 10 ways it Introduced a Little Anarchy”

Star Trek Discovery Series 1: Our review of Trek’s new Wagon Train to the Stars

Star Trek Discovery Series 1

Star Trek Discovery Series 1

Jokerside doesn’t often do reviews, but when it does, it’s for something big. When Star Trek returned to its natural small screen home for the first time in 12 years we were there to chart every episode of Discovery‘s first year. You can catch the in-depth reviews over at Jokershorts, but here’s the full season summary and for those rushing to Black Alert!

STAR TREK DISCOVERY SLUNK ONTO SCREENS IN SEPTEMBER 2017, BEHIND A PAYWALL IN THE US, SEVERAL MONTHS BEHIND ITS ORIGINAL SCHEDULE, IN THE WAKE OF RUMOUR AND TROUBLED PRODUCTION. MANY THOUGHT SOMEONE HAD JUMPED INTO A FIREFIGHT WITHOUT CHARGING THEIR PHASER. The full trailer had failed to convince naysayers, who hung onto canon as it crystallised in their grasp as much as it had galvanised those desperate for Trek‘s return.

It was over a year since the last of the current iteration of Star Trek films had been released. Star Trek  Beyond was a brilliant and entertaining film, one of the best reviewed of the season, but had sunk heavily at the box office, bafflingly released months before the franchise’s 50th anniversary.

That Discovery was produced as the flagship show for the streaming network of another company, CBS, said a lot about the fraught rights issues around Star Trek. That CBS hadn’t been the kindest about Star Trek‘s prospects in the years leading up to it said everything else. Bu there were more dramatic and pressing worries. The show’s production was delayed nominally because of the great inticacy of its design (plastic printed Klingon garbs), just one factor that left it vulnerable to being usurped. Seth macfarlane’s Orville duly warped in over on Fox, heavily ‘homaging’ the fan-favourite Star Trek: The Next Generation era in a mix of broad comedy and moral drama that won fair critical approval and audience. The challenge of serving up fresh Trek (having already amassed 725 television hours), set between The Original Series and Enterprise suddenly looked even steeper.

On the way, Discovery had also apparently lost one of its key assets. ’90s Trek veteran, televisual visionary and exactly who everyone wanted to run the new Star Trek show Bryan Fuller… Quit. Fired, pushed, a bit of both, it was a big blow.

Outside America, the rest of us loaded up Discovery on Netflix that autumn not knowing what to expect. But wouldn’t you know, all the above proved a fertile ground for a bold new era of Star Trek. Somehow the combination of concept, a lot carried from Fuller, and logistical need (“alright, let’s veer course and pad things out with the Mirror universe! or something”) set 15 episodes of first rate television, be it genre, science-fiction or plain of Star Trek.

Here’s our summary review of each episode, with our Series average at the end. Oh, and because this was tasty, and twisty throughout, you’ll see our theory-ometer for each episode too – a good indication of where our head’s were at! yIbaH!

1.1 & 1.2: Battle of the Binary Stars

“Discovery strives to set out both sides. And it wins the battle.
The ending’s even more rushed than the disintegration of unity on the USS Shenzhou bridge. But though we don’t see the consequences of big bad T’Kuvma’s mistake, hung on his devotion, the pinch that Burnham has inadvertently created a martyr of this Kahless reborn persists. We lose two compelling characters come the end, in a mess of a fall-out that submerges both sides in shadow and darkness. That’s how strong Discovery is, and the solid set of concepts that can drive missions into its web. We have a strong set of characters, fascinating dynamics and just enough sturdiness about the characters left behind to propel the series on, even if we have little idea how they’ll fit together in the series proper.

It’s bold, and its divisive. But Discovery’s talent prioritised the concept of the show as they saw it, acutely aware that it could never meet every expectations right out of space dock. Creating that potential on the back of so much continuity and such a long break is no mean feat.

CBS, have got a winner, one of the strongest Trek pilots in 51 years, and we haven’t even started the series properly yet. On the strength of this many more people will realise that come the series end.”

Rating: B+

[We also provided a Klingon review of these episodes, as it seemeed only right. the core there? rap je wovbe’!

Where was our theory-ometer? “Prime? this is the Kelvin timeline through and through…” Continue reading “Star Trek Discovery Series 1: Our review of Trek’s new Wagon Train to the Stars”

Halloween V: Re-carving the Pumpkin – Michael Myers Zombie-style

Halloween V: Re-carving the Pumpkin - Michael Myer Zombie-style

Halloween V: Re-carving the Pumpkin - Michael Myer Zombie-style

 

Halloween had tried a partial reboot for its 20th anniversary, but it was Rob Zombie who took the definitive slasher back to basics just before it’s 30th. Are you ready to head further behind the mask of Michael Myers than ever before? It’s brutal and all a little bit like history repeating…

“Sam, it’s a fucking massacre”

NINE TIMES LUCKY. AFTER 2002’s RESURRECTION WRENCHED THE FRANCHISE BACK TO ITS CLUMSY SIXTH INSTALMENT, THERE WAS AN APPETITE FOR THE FIRST FULL-SCALE REBOOT OF THE DEFINITIVE HORROR SLASHER. The leaner world of 21st century horror saw most box-office diverted to the dominant sub-genre of torture porn and graphic bodily violence, increasingly removed from the supernatural-tinged slashers of the ‘80s and ‘90s. 2003’s Freddy Vs Jason had closed the door on the slasher anti-heroes of the 80s, even if Michael Myers’ invite had been lost in the post, so there was only one way to go. Ditch the post-modern; go for a straight bat / carving knife.

It took five years for Rob Zombie’s reimagining to return Myers to the screen, returning to the slasher original, its shape reassembled to contemporary tastes. The new director was successfully hooked by rights holders Dimension Films following the favourable reception to his films, House of 1000 Corpses and The Devil’s Rejects. But before he allowed himself to be loose on the Shape, Zombie sought the sage advice of franchise grandee John Carpenter. Himself a master of the straight bat, Carpenter either advised, or requested, that Zombie, “make it his own”.

The former White Zombie front man was a compelling successor to Carpenter. As well as writing, directing, and producing, the sequel he could also carry heft in the music department (credited as music supervisor), like his illustrious predecessor – even if the ‘best horror film score’ ever had been taken. And the two films that emerged made for a compelling return. A closed chapter in the franchise, capturing a stark flavour and focus of its own, and one indelibly attached to Zombie’s name. His two-film run is a considered success, certainly beating other reimaginations in the genre, including 2009’s Friday the 13th or 2013’s The Evil Dead; although the pickings were slim.

Zombie’s intended to reclaim the original menace, reintroducing cinema goers to Michael Myers while showing them far more of the icon’s back story. That enabled Zombie to address what he perceived, ironically, as an over-familiarity with the slasher. One that had similarly dampened icons like Krueger and Vorhees in their sprawling horror franchises. He intended to stitch a biographical ambiguity into Michael’s famous journey back home. But adding a past and diluting the original purity, comes with consequences. Consequences for retuned characters, a set sequence of events, and the central antagonist’s MO. Tune up the keyboard. Let’s journey back to Haddonfield.

Halloween (2007) and Halloween II (2009)

“Look Miss Myers, I do not enjoy calling you down here every five minutes”

Zombie’s decision to delve into Michael Myers’ backstory has major implications for a film that, when in full slash mode replicates the original quite faithfully. The most notable change in those Haddonfield scenes is the considerable shortening of familiar scenes and relationships. The slow build-up and tension so essential to the emergence of the Shape in 1978 is compacted, affecting his appearance, style and movement as well as the web of characters he disturbs.

Child’s play

Halloween Season of the Witch and the Return of Michael MyersThere’s an uncompromising start, of course focussed on the Myers house. But instead of the tracking shot and reveal, we see the dysfunctional family in full, and barely watchable, swing. For all the attempt to add backstory to the hulking monster at the heart of the story, the film has to acknowledge that we already know who Myers is and what he will become. There was never the chance of a shock reveal, which pushes the weight of the narrative on the boy’s journey animal mutilator to knife-obsessed psychopath, although there’s plenty of the clown suit. We meet the live-in lout of a father figure and night-working mum; we see the horrors domestic abuse, the bullying at school, and the older sister who’s a factor in both. Crucially, we also see the baby at home, nicknamed Boo’ by her older brother – here, Michael’s aged to 10 – and also the child psychologist the school calls in when they find implicating pictures, and souvenirs of animal mutilation in his bag. A certain Dr Samuel Loomis. Continue reading “Halloween V: Re-carving the Pumpkin – Michael Myers Zombie-style”

Fictionside 105: When Franchises Head to Space!

Jokerside's Fictionside105-Heading to Space

Jokerside's Fictionside105-Heading to Space

Sometimes it makes utter, inarguable sense to take your franchise to space!

Often it doesn’t!

Our bi-annual Fictionside series heads to the stars with five franchises that did the same, as our fifth anniversary finds us zooming back to Earth!

WE’RE NOT HEADING TO SPACE – WE WERE ALWAYS THERE! As we take a long turn to head back to Earth for our fifth anniversary refit, at the end of our first utterly unique five year mission, Fictionside returns. Having taken in rules of rebooting, the peril of shared universes, and our favourite heroes and villains, we thought it was time to think outside the box.

So this Fictionside, we’re taking a look at five franchises that against all expectations ended up upgrading to a trip to space! It’s a race to the cosmos for genre franchises.

You know how it is, you have a great idea for a film, it makes some money and leads to a sequel. Suddenly you have a threequel, and maybe a prequel. There’s a whole mythology there goddamit, and these sprawling franchises have an inherent, proven genetic weakness: the creep of diminishing returns. If there’s a sure-fire way to dodge that large creative bullet, it’s to head to space. Thought no one in their right mind, ever.

Yet, for many a franchise that’s trying desperately to head to Earth with the will of its fans, from Battlestar Galactica to Alien to Planet of the Apes, there are 50,000 others that go the other way.

Fictionside salutes the almost inevitable cry of, “Sod it, we’ll just set it in space”. And as usual, there’s a Jokerside-slant. After all, the fun isn’t in which franchises headed to space, but the amount of films it took.

1. Dracula 3000 (2004)

Number of films to get to space: 1 (quite unbelievably this is neither a direct sequel to Dracula 2000, not the 3,000th Dracula film)

Dracula AD2014 on television and filmThere are many inherently brilliant characteristics that Bram Stoker’s Dracula cemented into the century old vampire myth, that have been submitted for countless planning applications over the past century and a quarter. The gifts of metamorphosis and zoolingualism, gravity defiance, immortality and super strength, even when in the form of a little old man with white hair – fine moustache or not. Then there’s vulnerability to stakes, reflections, faith symbols, particularly crucifixes and – oh yes, sunlight. So where better to put one of the fanged cornerstones of gothic horror, and count of modern horror, than a place where it’s bloody hard to hide from the sun.

Following 200’s, er, Dracula 2000, with its intriguing but mildly undermining link to the New Testament, 3000 can at least be thanked for steering above the ever-increasing trend to expand the novel’s love concept (See the bizarre Dracula Untold a decade later). While pulling in the Demeter, it’s not the Russian vessel adrift in the thrashing seas outside Port Whitby, but a freighter floating in space, the crew dead, the cargo rather mass-coffin shaped. Thank the garlic that it’s discovered by scavenger Captain Van Helsing. This entry is clearly an early cheat as a non-franchise film (it didn’t spawn on, say what?), and the fact the central character even rejects his own film’s title by being Count Orlock (F.W. Murnau’s Nosferatu clearly a far greater pointer to the stars than any other Dracula film).

But kicks of this list with its nice round ‘one’, and because we really love Dracula. (there’s no Frankenstein on this list, but later on there sure may be a film that feels like it…). The odds on Dracula heading to space were always short, and this proves it deserves a minimal stake. Continue reading “Fictionside 105: When Franchises Head to Space!”

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