Doctor Who: The Master through the Decades – The Classic Series Compression Eliminated

The Master 1970s 1980s 1990s

For the past two years, Jokerside has tracked the Doctor’s arch-nemesis through time… Well, through the past five decades. From his suave arrival in the 1970s to her tussles with the Twelfth Doctor, Jokerside presents the summary… The Master throughout the Classic Series!

IT’S THE DOCTOR’S 53RD BIRTHDAY, BUT IT’S STILL A GOOD FEW YEARS OFF THE GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY WHEN WE FIRST SAW HIM CATCH UP WITH AN OLD SCHOOL FRIEND. ARRIVING IN 1971, EIGHT YEARS AFTER THE DOCTOR, THE MASTER QUICKLY ESTABLISHED HIMSELF AT THE HIGH TABLE OF WHO VILLAINS. With some Doctors, particularly his fifth and third incarnations, the Master was a pervasive, era-defining foe. During his fourth incarnation, the first of the villain’s rare appearances proved to be a classic against the adversary. While almost the entirety of his eighth incarnation would have the Master in opposition. He’s the foe who has caused the death of at least two, possibly three, of the Doctor’s 13 lives so far. And that puts him far ahead of the other great contenders for the throne of evil.

Series 9 of the New Series kicked off with a spat between Davros and the Master, the latter now in her Mistress form, one-sided as it was. The creator of the Daleks emerged three years after the Master, but which one could be said to be the Doctor’s nemesis? Each character is a scientific genius, has put up with huge physical discomfort and revealed layers of intricate hate over the years, but there’s an important difference. Davros is the background to the Doctor’s great opposition, the one we’ve followed from its very beginning. But the Master, purely malevolent, emerged fully formed with so much of his back-story with the Doctor and the universe in general, hidden in time.

Where from Whovember?

For the anniversary Whovember retrospectives, Jokerside took each of the Classic Series Doctors, and followed a specific journey through each incarnation. Having completed the Eleventh Doctor retrospective, where else could Jokerside go but the Moriarty to the Time Lord hero’s Holmes? Taking a similar tack with the Doctor’s nemesis, what started as the spring-based MarchSter series grew to span six decades. From suave opportunist to desperate survivalist in one era, from android to Time Lady in another. When it comes to the classic years, it all began in a circus…

  1. Doctor Who: The Master in the 1970s – Arrival of the “Unimaginative Plodder”

Terror of the Autons, Season 8 (1971)

The Original Master - Doctor Who Marchester takeoverWe should have known when it started so surreally… At the beginning of Doctor Who’s Eighth Season an eccentric Time Lord, popping up in a Monty Python-going-on-Douglas Adams way, warns the Doctor that his old school colleague had arrived on Earth with the marvellous parting shot, “oh, good luck!” We’d already seen the Master arrive by that point, setting an immediate dapper impression in the crucially off-kilter setting of a circus. As Jokerside observed, “In just a few lines, in his first scene (appearing before the Doctor), Robert Holmes and Roger Delgado define a cool, impeccable, menacing and powerful nemesis.”

Indeed, Robert Holmes made yet another crucial contribution to the fabric of the series by shaping a brilliant Moriarty to the Doctor’s academic, occasionally Venusian Aikido-flaunting, Holmes:

“The Doctor has never worn facial hair, except when in disguise or imprisoned for years in a dwarf star alloy cube, apart from the odd sweeping sideburn that the 1970s couldn’t control. The Master… Had a beard, a goatee that may as well have had a “twiddle this ‘tache menacingly” label hanging from it. The Master had a fine taste in suits, the Doctor had a frilly shirt, multiple coloured velvet jackets and a cape! The Master was a force for evil, with hypnotic control cowardice. The Doctor was noble, occasionally grumpy but compassionate. The Master had a working chameleon circuit in a TARDIS with an occasionally black interior, occasionally reversed. They both dished out the same faint praise to each other, but then again they are both Time Lords.”

But Holmes’ doesn’t just deal in symmetry in shaping a character that would remain as antagonist in every story that season:

“The Master arrives with supreme superiority, no bad feat when facing off against the Third Doctor. It’s in Terror of the Autons that the sparring starts, but where the pretty compelling evidence that the Master is an all-round more skilled scientist than the Doctor is set. Why else would the Doctor feel the need to ridicule him so much?” Read more…

Doctor Who: Ranking the Hiatuses!

doctor Who on hiatus

They’re a crucial part of being a Doctor Who fan. And. It’s. Happening. Again.

But how does the latest pause in broadcast weigh up?

IT’S ONE YEAR SINCE DOCTOR WHO SERIES 9 BEGAN IN A HAZE OF ODDLY PITCHED PUBLICITY. You remember: low on any mention of Davros even though that scheming despot revealed his face before the first episode’s titles rolled and high on “same old, same old – just the Doctor and Clara Oswald in the TARDIS”.  A riveting campaign.

Still, it was a whistle-stop series that ninth one. Multi-part stories had taken a lengthy break between Series 6 and 8, but they roared back in 2015. Constant two-parters and linked single-parters meant broadcast weeks flew by like a mid-western café-TARDIS in the vortex. That was compounded by the 12th Doctor’s second run, like Series 8 before it, making a mere 12 parts as opposed to the 13 instalments the show enjoyed for the first seven years of its renaissance. So, we were getting less Who and it was pelting by quicker than ever. That much was clear. But a year on, having a good look around, there’s no not a flash of a scarf, fez or velvet jacket in sight. The Doctor’s not in.

In late winter the 13th episode of 2015, the obligatory Christmas Special, was posthumously revelled to be the last episode of Doctor Who we’d see for a whole year. A whole year we were already a year into. There was to be a pause, a year off, a hiatus. It’s the kind of announcement that Doctor Who fans thrive on. Because they’re used to it. All the better that last year’s Christmas special wasn’t a full pelt classic, but a rather linear one-joke story of nothing much at all. What better to spend a year without Doctor Who, while countless other genre shows over the Atlantic churn out full seasons of over 20 episodes with little perspiration, than rewatching The Husbands of River Song. Doctor Who will return in spring 2017, likely the Easter weekend in April.

But in that spirit of pure, niggled injustice, itself celebrating a 30th anniversary this year while the one year anniversary of Series 9 goes unmarked, Jokerside pays tribute to Who’s years of utter Doctor-less misery.

Brave Heart!

Jokerside’s definitive ranking of Doctor Who hiatuses

11th Doctor hiatus
NUMBER 5 (Joint): 4 June 2011 to 11 August 2011

AKA When Nobody Noticed

Caused by: The 11th Doctor and the Ponds

It was the first sign of a horrid and virulent infection…

How we survived: Well, who noticed? It was just a couple of months. And it’s perfectly normal behaviour to split a series of 13 episodes into two batches and stage mid-series finales and premieres that impressively rendered the whole River Song story arc all the more difficult to follow.

In fact, it was the first sign of a horrid and virulent infection. This most insidious of acts led us inexorably on to Series 7 which dared split itself over two years when already saddled with mid-season companion changes and the misguided restriction to single-part ‘blockbuster’ episodes. But worst of all, that split shifted the show to… Autumn. Who in its natural habitat you might think. Rolling onto Saturday as the nights as drew in. Only it didn’t work out like that. And all the time the execs quietly hoped that shift meant that… No-one would notice we’d lost a year of Who. As of 2017 we reach the 10th series in the 12th year of is revival thanks to this middle-aged crisis.

Yes, it all started with that trip to the States and the astronaut in the lake. As strong as that first half of Series Six is (pirates excluded), very little about it makes sense.

10th Doctor hiatusNUMBER 5 (Joint): 25 December 2008 to 1 January 2010

AKA: The Specials Hiatus

Caused by: The 10th Doctor (and behind the arras, Hamlet)

Insidious and far more intelligent

How we survived: Again, who noticed? Well, everyone. Because while this was less insidious and far more intelligent than the later series splits, it unavoidably resulted in just five hours of Doctor Who in little over a year, the vast majority of it stuffed into autumn 2009. The only thing we could reasonably expect is that the promise of loner specials couldn’t quite live up to their promise at all. And so it proved. That strange year did have one essential function however: giving us an extra year of David Tennant. And it’s a template that’s stuck, unless Peter Capaldi chooses to break it. Matt Smith followed tenant and inarguably left the show one year too early. Barring accidents, it’s difficult to think that any modern Doctor won’t throw in the time-towel after three seasons and a break of some kind. Although those Specials were by far the neatest solution. Read more…

Doctor Who Series 9: A Change of Bootstraps

Doctor Who Series 9 Under the Lake and Before the Flood
“Well on the plus side, at least he doesn’t need those sonic sunglasses any more…”

The second of a series of essays inspired by the stories of Doctor Who Series Nine, it’s time to take on the waters of time with Under the Lake and Before the Flood. Headache inducing, but reassuringly unexhaustive in this timeline.

“There’s nothing more ironic than an unfinished requiem”

AFTER THE LEGACY-SERVING ROMP OF STEVEN MOFFAT’S TWO-PART DALEK PREMIERE THE RELIABLE HANDS OF TOBY WHITHOUSE BROUGHT US A CLASSIC STORY THAT MANAGED TO MARRY CLAUSTROPHOBIA WITH THE EXPANSE OF TIME. It was almost a story of two parts, but not quite. Below the Lake and Before the Flood were linked by an internal logic in almost as distinctive in New Who as the episodes’ striking locations. Depending on how you looked at it, Before the Flood could be set in the past with flash-forwards or the other way round. But while cause and effect was at the forefront of the episode, and crucial to the resolution, the mystery of the first part was only pushed a little further back rather than pushed out he way.

As is always the risk, the least surprising part of this story was that things weren’t quite what they seemed. But how could it be when the Doctor had been so certain that he was dealing with ghosts? His previous younger and more excitable selves hadn’t been blown away in Army of Ghosts or Hide.

It was a jam packed story. The Jörmungandr Norse mural was writing on the wall in its true sense. A portent as the affectionately Star Trek uniformed characters set sea against a storm of a big dragon like, red faced monster. Norse mythology will continue its running theme throughout this series next week… And while there were franchise scrambling references to Star Wars as well as Star Trek on the way, the real paradox was classical and physical.

Yes, In this case the bootstraps were pulled from the feet of the Doctor, Clara, us, and poor old Ludwig Van Beethoven. We weren’t expecting that at the end of Under the Lake. Nor maybe a talking to…

Physics lesson

Of course those bootstraps belong to a paradox, as we were immediately informed in the second part’s opening lecture… I suppose it started with Listen. The Doctor popping up ambiguously address the audience directly, like good old Bob Ballard showing up at the end of an episode of SeaQuest DSV. If only Tom Baker had thought of that instead of a talking cabbage for a companion in the mid-1970s. Then again, while it’s effective it’s a horrible short-cut of an expository plot device that can’t help undermine what’s otherwise a clever little story. We may not have to worry about over indulgent catchphrases at the moment, but that will hopefully be kept on a short leash. Or we’ll find that all this time there’s been someone else aboard the TARDIS…

The collective noun for paradoxes

Familiar to Doctor Who fans…

So what was the Doctor explaining? One among a number of different posited temporal paradoxes. A familiar one is the grandfather paradox, postulated by writer Nathaniel Schachner in Ancestral Voices in 1933. There the easy logic is that a time traveller cannot venture back in time and kill his grandfather at a point before the time traveller’s existence is guaranteed. To do so would eliminate the possibility of the time traveller existing in the first place, so would eliminate his actions in the past… Only to ensure the grandfather existed so the time traveller could in fact attempt it. And so that spirals on. It can’t help but appear a rather banally biological and very human approach to temporal physics.  It also conjures up other issues. Even if the time traveller attempted the same after his bloodline was secure, he wouldn’t be able to alter anything that would prevent his travelling back in the future. For instance a badly injured grandfather with years of in-built aggression against a homicidal grandson – or one who withdraws his science funding. All grandfathers should be prepared to do that. See Ray Bradbury’s marvellous Sound of Thunder for an alteration that leaves a time traveller acutely aware of the horrifically minor changes resulting from his mistakes in the past. Read more…

Doctor Who Series 9: Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam, Skaro and the End of the Acid Reign

Doctor Who Series 9 The Magician's Apprentice
“Guys! Guys! I think I’ve landed a walk on part…”

The first of a series of essays inspired by the stories of Doctor Who Series Nine, starting with a trip to a mysterious planet in The Magician’s Apprentice and The Witch’s Familiar.

HOW WILL HISTORY RECORD THE MOFFAT ERA? THAT’S NOT A QUESTION FOR NOW OF COURSE, AND ONE UNLIKELY TO BE ANSWERED FOR A LONG TIME. WHEN THE SONIC GLASSES HAVE GATHERED DUST, WHEN THE TWELFTH DOCTOR’S MYSTERIOUS, HAWKISH, STRANGELY FAMILIAR FACE IS LONG GONE. Steven Moffat has written for more Doctors than anyone else, and you can’t even say with any confidence that he’s on his final one as showrunner… Having crossed confidentially onto his second Doctor and nearing the end of his second major companion, it’s not clear Who will go down as Moffat’s ‘definitive’ Doctor. And that joyfully creative mess sets out a simple stall…

Thanks for all the fish

Douglas Adams was surely Graham Williams’ ideal ally…

Moffat’s remarked on his regard for one time script editor Douglas Adams, not just for his small but extraordinary body of personal work (who doesn’t?), but for the legendary writer’s rather more divisive tenure on Doctor Who. In the mid-1970s, Adams had made a living out from writing comedy for radio, even forming a writing partnership with Monty Python’s Graham Chapman and being only one of two people outside the troupe to gain a writing credit on a sketch for the Flying Circus. Not fully on board with the likes of deadlines and delivery, it’s still surprising that he took the script editing seat for Season 17 in 1979 alongside producer Graham Williams. It didn’t help that the laws of the universe ensured that his little radio series The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy was commissioned for broadcast at the same time. Still, for the producer unlucky to follow Philip Hinchcliffe, tasked with fencing the show off from the heavy criticism that met his predecessor while retaining the viewing figures, Adams was surely an ideal ally.

The result is one of Who’s real mixed bags. Sadly, having already contributed a mind-bogglingly budget-straining script to the show the year before, Adams generally takes the credit for the highs of that time, while the lows are rather unfairly brushed under Graham Williams’ production seat. Adam’s The Pirate Planet from Season 16 is seen as a doughty attempt push ambition onto a screen that can barely contain it, The City of Death (co-written by a strained Williams and Adams from David Fisher’s idea under the David Agnew pseudonym) is a beautiful mess of sharp scripting, superb casting, foreign location and hard science fiction that managed to claim the classic show’s highest ratings. Shada had the foresight to never complete its production and shot swiftly for mythical status.

The rest of season 17 retains a fair few detractors, although there remains a few ardent fans for that loose and difficult time before the strident science of script editor Christopher H. Bidmead swept in, while Tom Baker took an arbitrary approach to whether the material bored him of filled him with sizzling physical comedy. If you like your Who served as comedy this is the place to find it.

Don’t Blink

To paraphrase 10cc, it’s just a phase Who’s going through.

Read more…

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