Tag: Silurians

Doctor Who: Moff v RTD – When Steven Moffat made History (New Who special)

Moffat Davies New Doctor Who

Moffat Davies New Doctor Who

A special glimpse at Doctor Who for Doctor Who New Series Day! FOUR stories where Steven Moffat became the show’s most important figure.

IT’S 26TH MARCH, 11 YEARS SINCE ROSE FIRST SCREENED ON BBC ONE AND SO DESIGNATED NEW WHO DAY ON JOKERSIDE. We loves an anniversary and so does the Doctor but following last year’s look at how the New Series measures up to the Classic Series, what to look at this time?

Well, as usual with the good Doctor, these are interesting times. Off the back of Series Nine, quite plausibly the best series for many a year although hamstrung by a weak pay off, things could have been rosy for the confirmed tenth series. But things are seldom such plain sailing. The New Series, having contributed over 40% of the show’s stories in just the past 11 years, was seemingly going nowhere. And then came the show entering what Jokerside considers to be its third worst ever hiatus.  2016 will see a measly single episode of the show, recalling the dark emptiness of years like, well, 2014. Still, it’s another indication of the odd difficulty that a series obsessed with change has with production changes as Moffat makes way for Chris Chibnall in 2018.

But, with a year up his sleeve, the last year has proved a momentous one for Steven Moffat. Already holding the record for writing for the most incarnations of the Doctor onscreen since he advented the twelfth incarnation, he’s now Who’s most prolific writer and most senior figure of all time. So for this anniversary, Jokerside’s taking a look at… WHEN MOFF TOOK OVER!

Classic track back

Hulke and Whitaker have sole dibs on the legend off writing for each of the first three Doctors

During the classic era, the legendary Robert Holmes lead the writing field having contributed 16 stories across five Doctors, starting with the Second Doctor adventure The Krotons in 1969. It was his record of writing cross-generationally onscreen that Moffat broke in 2013 with the casting of Peter Capaldi and the sly minisode Night of the Doctor which gave Paul McGann’s Eight Doctor a fine belated send off.

Dalek JokertoonDuring those classic years, only Terry Nation (with 10), David Whitaker (eight) and Malcolm Hulke (seven) came close to Holmes. Those three were part of the old guard, with Nation masterminding mostly Dalek Stories all the way up to 1979’s less than imperious Destiny of the Daleks. In the meantime he had introduced the first arcs of sorts (The Keys of Marinus and The Dalek Masterplan crossed serials like never before), took the Daleks to Hollywood and founded Blake’s Seven and other classic shows. David Whitaker was Who’s original script editor, setting up the template amid the show’s wonderful early democracy and overseeing the introduction of those Daleks when he pushed Nation’s script to screen. Hulke and Whitaker have sole dibs on the legend off writing for each of the first three Doctors, even though Whitaker had suspicions that the show would never be renewed in 1964. While Nation wrote for the Fourth Doctor, he missed out on Patrick Troughton’s Second Doctor while he took the Pepper pots to America. Intriguingly, it was Whitaker who stepped into the Skaro breach to pen two adventures for Troughton’s first year under script editors Gerry Davis and Peter Bryant that are justifiably filed under definite, if lost, classics.

New acceleration

When the New Series roared back under the excellent stewardship of Russell T Davies, it was no strain for the new model lead writer to surpass those classic benchmarks. Stripped back to 13 x 45 minute episodes a year, the American styled showrunner role wasn’t barred from commissioning themselves to write stories like the old model script editor had been, but would instead take point in plotting the seasons, arcs and key episodes. The lost stats would go to episodes, with a primary focus on sewing up stories in a single run of 45 minutes, some records were left to the Classic years.

By the time of his departure in 2009, Davies had penned 25 episodes to Holmes 16, although the eminent Classic writer’s 64 episode contributions are almost double Davies’. And that’s not comparing the various rewrites Holmes nor indeed Davies carried out on stories that fell under their production tenures as script editor and lead writer respectively. Speculation suggests that rewrites and advanced script editing were more common under Davies than Moffat’s era despite the co-written episode that popped up throughout the enhanced Missy arc of 2014’s Series Eight and into Series Nine – recalling the collaborative approach that Davies took to 2009’s year of Specials.

Head to Head

Steven Moffat’s time in charge will stand gigantic in Who’s immense history

With Series Nine taking the number of years under Moffat’s control to five, he clearly surpassed Davies Four Series and Specials. With one series to wrap thing sup, splitting his tenure almost neatly between three series of two Doctors, there’s no doubt that Steven Moffat’s time in charge will stand gigantic in Who’s immense history. It’s possible, but surely unlikely to be beaten for a very long time.

To measure how considerable his presence has been, look at him in the context of the show’s 52 and half year history.

Of the whole show’s 52 and a bit years of 826 episodes, 263 stories and 35 seasons/series, Moffat has overseen 7%, 22% and 15% respectively. So far. And to rub it in, he’s introduced two memorable Time Lords who will both sit highly in story rankings while quite plausibly introducing the show’s greatest count of new monsters (and reintroducing two second tier classics in the Silurians and Ice Warriors).

So when did Moffat succeeded RTD as the show’s most significant figure?  

Sound of Drumroll…

The rules have been kept very simple in this tussle of the Time Lord Herding Titans. Only series and full length specials count towards episodes or stories. No specials like Time Crash, minisodes or extra scenes. And definitely not Moffat’s Curse of Fatal Death from 1999. Continue reading “Doctor Who: Moff v RTD – When Steven Moffat made History (New Who special)”

Doctor Who at 10 years old: Classic versus New

The Mistress, Time Lady and Cyberman

New Doctor Who Tenth Anniversary

A decade in, how’s the bold New Doctor Who bearing up to compared to its Classic predecessor

10 YEARS. 10 YEAR’S ALREADY. 10 YEARS. THE TIN ANNIVERSARY. AND THEY SAY TIME IS RELATIVE. Since Doctor Who returned on 26th March 2005 we’ve heard more about fixed and immovable points of time than ever before. Sure, they haven’t been treated too consistently over the past decade, but if ever there was a point that had ultimate mobility it was one spring day 10 years ago.

Jokerside’s always been kind to the show’s prolonged hiatus. For all the shame that Who was cut down at the all too young age of 26, when it was reaching a considerable 1980s high, and clearly by decision makers who had little objectivity, the hiatus has proved crucial to the show’s legacy. True, we might have lived without the American TV Movie, although losing Paul McGann would have been criminal. More important was the throng of fan activity that quickly swung into place to continue the Doctor’s adventures and keep the Sacred Flame alive during the lean early 1990s; imaginations starved that quickly adapted to generating content for themselves.

Creative Explosion

Keeping the Sacred Flame alive

The New Adventures came about through the chance inquisitiveness of Peter Darvill-Evans at Virgin Publishing, before BBC books found repeating that magic wasn’t that easy. Among the roster of Virgin’s subsequent New and Missing Adventures were Russell T Davies, Mark Gatiss, Gareth Roberts, Paul Cornell… On screen, the wittily disrespectful Curse of Fatal Death gave Steven Moffat a chance to script Who that wouldn’t otherwise have materialised. At the end of the decade, Big Finish roared into prolific recording, reviving those would be soon called classic doctors thanks to Nick Briggs, Gary Russell et al – creators who would have a significant role to play in 21st Century Who.

While many were dragged into the world of New Who following their involvement in the above, reputations enhanced by proven success, there’s no doubt that the looser editorial control in the early 1990s (that is, from the BBC) allowed Who to diversify and deepen far more than it could on television. And the legacy of creative explosion on New Who is undeniable, even as it sits proudly back its traditional Saturday family slot.

Time Wars

Masterful appropriation of fate

More importantly, when all these events combine, the hiatus became the ideal metaphor for the perfectly vague Time War. A non-descript, highly destructive war of which few could speak and the Doctor would take no little time to recover from: Masterful appropriation of fate.

Who loves a birthday, but has rarely managed to hit the date. There may be something coming up in Series Nine to celebrate this anniversary, which would be a neat reference to the Classic series 10th anniversary special, which may have fallen in Season 10 but was almost a whole year early. Whatever happens, we’ll be very lucky to see Three Doctors team up this time around.

So if you took 10 key points of Doctor Who – how would these first 10 years of New Who compare to the Classic Series?

  1. THE TUNE AND THE TUNNEL

New Who has been lucky to retain Murray Gold for its entire run

1973

Delia Derbyshire’s distinctive arrangement of Ron Grainger’s theme stayed broadly unmolested for seven years from the moment her second version had rung out at 17:16 on 23rd November 1963, just as the highly influential work of genius in the key of E should. There were a few minor tweaks of course – such as the echoes that appeared during Patrick Troughton’s first season. With colour and overhaul to the title sequence that had managed to last one doctor without sporting the protagonist’s face, came the first big theme change. Jon Pertwee’s first season in 1970 saw extra sting to match its Quatermass horrors arrive during The Ambassadors of Death. But the Third Doctor also saw his tune lose some of the introduction, completely mislay the middle eight and take fright at fading, opting for a stutter and eerie chopping.
Continue reading “Doctor Who at 10 years old: Classic versus New”

Doctor Who: The Late 1970s, The Fourth Doctor and Stitches in Time

Doctor Who and the late 1970s

Doctor Who and the late 1970s

 

40 years on from his first full appearance, there may not be a better time to look at the Fourth Doctor, still the very real and lasting giant of the series.  As Last Christmas showed, there’s a lot to be said for a snappy, irritable, aloof and alien Doctor in this universe. It’s not just the Glam side of the 1970s that will play a key role in the future of Doctor Who?

THE START OF THIS WEEK MARKED ONE OF THE GREAT ANNIVERSARIES IN ALL WHODOM: 40 YEARS SINCE THE FOURTH DOCTOR’S FIRST FULL EPISODE. He’d already appeared at the tail-end of Planet of the Spiders in June 1974. But lying prone on the floor, there was precious little indication of what was to come, even in that first rather simplistic serial Robot. In hindsight, after a staggering seven seasons, encompassing 41 stories and 172 episodes Tom Baker’s Fourth Doctor remains the most prolific of the Time Lords. The Tenth and Eleventh incarnations would come close with 36 and 39 stories respectively, thanks to 2005’s format change. But still, despite the strong and sterling headway the last two made in America, it’s often the famous grinning, long-scarved figure of the Fourth that pops up in popular culture.

Repetition

Losing his hat where Pertwee would pick up his cape…

Jokerside’s Whovember series took a long look at the Fourth Doctor’s debut season, reasoning that it’s the single finest series of Doctor Who. And when it came to his debut appearance, it was clear that “Tom Baker… did something different”:

“Immediately, Baker’s Doctor isn’t as attached to UNIT as Pertwee’s had been, even during his last season. He can’t wait to escape but as he says, “I hate goodbyes”. Watching it, I can’t help but think what any other Doctor would have done. Had it been the Sixth, he may well have buckled down a lot sooner. Still, the Fourth had his own slightly too silly costume selection to make. Overlong and reaching, fortunately once chosen, it’s the speed and comfort that’s the punch line. Years of familiarity have enhanced the joke. And then the more telling phrase for this Doctor: “There’s no such word as can’t”.

“Hanging between that and “No point in being grown up if you can’t be childish sometimes” the Fourth Doctor comes straight out of a peculiar Gallifreyan can. One that’s bigger on the inside obviously. They are words to live by, and live he does. Lounging around Bessie in a way Pertwee would have tutted at, losing his hat where Pertwee would pick up his cape – but still carrying off the role of the scientist when he needs to.”

Doctor Who: A Fresh Scarf – “Harry Sullivan is an imbecile” (Whovember #4)

Though resolutely still in the UNIT set-up, albeit one softened by the Third Doctor’s recent mobility, and written by Third Doctor stalwart Terrance Dicks, the Fourth Doctor’s initial appearance is an instant tide-turner. Almost immediately – far more than his predecessor, a noted comic actor – Baker is happy to lets loose with laugh out loud moments. True, he’s nominally not ‘acting’ a new persona as much Pertwee had, but he’s instantly engaging.

To summarise the Whovember breakdown, Tom Baker’s arrival got everything right. Though cast by outgoing producer Barry Letts the new Doctor couldn’t have hoped for a better incoming producer and script editor. While he may be losing an increasingly sparse UNIT family, Baker was incredibly lucky in the companion stakes. Sarah Jane Smith really came into her own when paired with this incarnation of the Time Lord, possibly his perfect foil. But she wasn’t alone, with a season of (lovable) public school idiot Harry Sullivan rounding off one of the all-time classic TARDIS crews. That’s fortunate, as the first full season story arc in the history of Who saw them propelled across five adventures over 20 weeks with very little TARDIS in sight. Continue reading “Doctor Who: The Late 1970s, The Fourth Doctor and Stitches in Time”

Doctor Who: The Early 1970s, The Third Doctor and Velvet Aspirations

Doctor Who and the 1970s

Third Doctor Twelfth Doctor

40 years on from the demise of his third incarnation, the Twelfth Doctor’s arrival looks like it will not so much reverse the polarity as boost the popularity of the dandy Time Lord of action. But as the new Doctor may ask, could the real question be how important the 1970s are in the future of Doctor Who?

IN THE 2013 CELEBRATIONS OF ALL THINGS WHO, IT WAS THE SECOND DOCTOR’S STOCK THAT ROSE THE MOST. As the major casualty of the BBC’s catastrophic episode pulping, we’ve been robbed of the majority of his stories. True, some of them have earned a heightened classic status through their disappearance and the hope of their discovery, but for the most part appreciation for the Second Doctor hung on memory and some key rediscoveries like The Tomb of the Cybermen.

For his recorder toots to rise higher in the mix, especially in 2013, something major would have to happen. And fortunately it did. The rediscovery of two of his lost adventures, one long-craved, and the demise of the Eleventh Doctor – the one successor who owes Patrick Troughton’s cosmic hobo the most, unexpectedly pushed him to prominence.

So, with wrangles on the ‘rediscovery’ of further lost adventures ‘possibly’ ongoing and the Eleventh Doctor left on the Fields of Trenzalore, perhaps it’s only natural that 2014 is turning into the year of the Third Doctor. Series Eight brings us one of the largest shake-ups of the new era just as 1970 brought a brave new world of colour and a format sea change when Jon Pertwee’s Time Lord fell through the TARDIS doors… Continue reading “Doctor Who: The Early 1970s, The Third Doctor and Velvet Aspirations”

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