Star Trek Discovery Series 1: Our review of Trek’s new Wagon Train to the Stars

Star Trek Discovery Series 1

Jokerside doesn’t often do reviews, but when it does, it’s for something big. When Star Trek returned to its natural small screen home for the first time in 12 years we were there to chart every episode of Discovery‘s first year. You can catch the in-depth reviews over at Jokershorts, but here’s the full season summary and for those rushing to Black Alert!

STAR TREK DISCOVERY SLUNK ONTO SCREENS IN SEPTEMBER 2017, BEHIND A PAYWALL IN THE US, SEVERAL MONTHS BEHIND ITS ORIGINAL SCHEDULE, IN THE WAKE OF RUMOUR AND TROUBLED PRODUCTION. MANY THOUGHT SOMEONE HAD JUMPED INTO A FIREFIGHT WITHOUT CHARGING THEIR PHASER. The full trailer had failed to convince naysayers, who hung onto canon as it crystallised in their grasp as much as it had galvanised those desperate for Trek‘s return.

It was over a year since the last of the current iteration of Star Trek films had been released. Star Trek  Beyond was a brilliant and entertaining film, one of the best reviewed of the season, but had sunk heavily at the box office, bafflingly released months before the franchise’s 50th anniversary.

That Discovery was produced as the flagship show for the streaming network of another company, CBS, said a lot about the fraught rights issues around Star Trek. That CBS hadn’t been the kindest about Star Trek‘s prospects in the years leading up to it said everything else. Bu there were more dramatic and pressing worries. The show’s production was delayed nominally because of the great inticacy of its design (plastic printed Klingon garbs), just one factor that left it vulnerable to being usurped. Seth macfarlane’s Orville duly warped in over on Fox, heavily ‘homaging’ the fan-favourite Star Trek: The Next Generation era in a mix of broad comedy and moral drama that won fair critical approval and audience. The challenge of serving up fresh Trek (having already amassed 725 television hours), set between The Original Series and Enterprise suddenly looked even steeper.

On the way, Discovery had also apparently lost one of its key assets. ’90s Trek veteran, televisual visionary and exactly who everyone wanted to run the new Star Trek show Bryan Fuller… Quit. Fired, pushed, a bit of both, it was a big blow.

Outside America, the rest of us loaded up Discovery on Netflix that autumn not knowing what to expect. But wouldn’t you know, all the above proved a fertile ground for a bold new era of Star Trek. Somehow the combination of concept, a lot carried from Fuller, and logistical need (“alright, let’s veer course and pad things out with the Mirror universe! or something”) set 15 episodes of first rate television, be it genre, science-fiction or plain of Star Trek.

Here’s our summary review of each episode, with our Series average at the end. Oh, and because this was tasty, and twisty throughout, you’ll see our theory-ometer for each episode too – a good indication of where our head’s were at! yIbaH!

1.1 & 1.2: Battle of the Binary Stars

“Discovery strives to set out both sides. And it wins the battle.
The ending’s even more rushed than the disintegration of unity on the USS Shenzhou bridge. But though we don’t see the consequences of big bad T’Kuvma’s mistake, hung on his devotion, the pinch that Burnham has inadvertently created a martyr of this Kahless reborn persists. We lose two compelling characters come the end, in a mess of a fall-out that submerges both sides in shadow and darkness. That’s how strong Discovery is, and the solid set of concepts that can drive missions into its web. We have a strong set of characters, fascinating dynamics and just enough sturdiness about the characters left behind to propel the series on, even if we have little idea how they’ll fit together in the series proper.

It’s bold, and its divisive. But Discovery’s talent prioritised the concept of the show as they saw it, acutely aware that it could never meet every expectations right out of space dock. Creating that potential on the back of so much continuity and such a long break is no mean feat.

CBS, have got a winner, one of the strongest Trek pilots in 51 years, and we haven’t even started the series properly yet. On the strength of this many more people will realise that come the series end.”

Rating: B+

[We also provided a Klingon review of these episodes, as it seemeed only right. the core there? rap je wovbe’!

Where was our theory-ometer? “Prime? this is the Kelvin timeline through and through…” Read more…

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1966: Star Trek at 50

1966: Star Trek at 50

It’s 50 years to the day that Star Trek first transported onto NBC at 8:30… In celebration of five decades of the intergalactic pop-culture giant that followed, Jokerside takes a look at that classic first year…

Star Trek: The Original Series

IT WAS THE FIRST SERIES OF STAR TREK THAT SET A CRUCIAL LINK BETWEEN THE SHOW AND TIME. Three instances to be specific, and one of those, City on the Edge of Forever, remains a science-fiction classic. Time travel would return to Trek again and again… But it was just one of the staples of the franchise that came ready-made for exploration in the 29-part season that aired between 1966 and 1967. So much of what would become synonymous with Star Trek was set in those early days, but it’s just as well time travel was present and correct. Because pinning an anniversary on Star Trek could take Spock months of slingshot calculations.

The past

“To boldly go…”

A key date was April 1964 when creator Gene Roddenberry pitched his draft for Star Trek draft to Desilu Productions, run by Lucile Ball and producer of her shows including I love Lucy and at that time The Lucy Show. The concept developed from the adventures of Robert April Captain of the S.S. Yorktown to the first pilot The Cage, centred around Captain Christopher Pike in the form of Jeffrey Hunter. The Cage was commissioned in May 1964, filmed later that year and promptly passed on by NBC. Famously dismissed as “too cerebral” they did see a glimmer of something in the premise. And so, against all expectation they commissioned a second pilot, Where No Man Has Gone Before, which switched control of the Enterprise to William Shatner’s Captain James T. Kirk. Accepted, series production commenced and Where No Man Has Gone before aired on 22 September 1966. But wait, that’s not right…

Star Trek had a tortuous genesis. The kind Khan Noonien Singh would happily defrost to detonate. In February 1966, four months before production on that second pilot started, when that script was emerging from its own difficult selection process, Desilu almost called time on the embryonic show. Used to half hour productions, they were financially overburdened by their risky new space venture and their other hour-long production, Mission Impossible. It was Head of production Herb Solow who managed to calm things down. Then, when it came to transmission, the running order threw up all sorts of issues for the show’s uncertain network. So, in the event Where No Man Has Gone Before was screened third in the running order, the premiere falling to on 8 September. To make matters slightly more confusing, Star Trek was properly first broadcast on 6 September, 1966 on Canada’s CTV network.

But then, from difficult beginnings… For all its triumph on the big screen, grossing $2.3 billion over 13 films so far, television is the real berth of the good ship Enterprise. And that’s why 8 September is the date. When Star Trek hit its home nation network and began a classic and influential year. All the more idiosyncratic that it couldn’t shake off its unusual production history.

Hitting the ground running

“Out here we’re the only policemen around”

It wasn’t simply that Where No Man Has Gone Before stepped back in the running order. Just about the first third of that first year is jumbled around thanks to the network’s desperate juggling of themes and stories. Looking at the produced episodes, many of which were spilling over schedule thanks to on-set rewrites, they felt their toes chill. There are some dynamic effects from the transmission order as it emerged that Fall. It’s strange to see Uhura’s role reduce then grow again, just as it is for old pal Gary Mitchell to pop up three episodes in, about the same time as the ship’s complement decides to change uniform for a week (a switch back to the heavy crew necks of The Cage uniforms). But it’s not insurmountable. And while that running order makes watching the first series a little more difficult than it should be, as the network’s decisions knock the balance of that first year off, it immediately highlights the rugged survivalism built into the concept. The strength of the conceit and the core characters was there almost instantly, and from its formative days Star Trek was girded for the future.

The show would burn brightly and quickly. Cancelled after a reduced third year, it would be years spent in syndication that developed its true following and proved its enduring appeal, leading to its mild television resurgence in the 1970s, shift to the big screen and proliferation in the 1980s and 1990s. Those glorious days before story arcs, where running order was irrelevant to broadcast. Star Trek took the test with its first episode and proved that optimism is everything. And so it was that when The Man Trap aired on 8 September it easily won its time slot with a 40.6 share of the audience.

What unfolded until 13 April 1967 was a quite incredible 29-part run. There’s barely a dud among the bunch, quite the opposite of the reputation that subsequent Star Trek series would earn for their weak opening years. What’s particularly astonishing is how easily Star Trek managed to reflect contemporary culture, for good and bad, establish a template for talented creators to comment on that contemporary culture and also set so many of the themes, facets and recurring elements that have remained with the show and film series for 50 years. No doubt those will be present and correct when Star Trek Discovery hits in 2017.

What better way to celebrate the show than look at those crucial ingredients. Read more…

Star Trek: What’s your Inner Star Trek Alien?

What's your inner Star Trek Alien header?

You don’t have to be a Trill to discover your inner alien!

A Kazon of the Delta Quadrant, a Vorta of the Gamma Quadrant or the take-it-or-leave it approach to foreheads adopted by those closer-to-home Klingons? It’s what you’ve been waiting for… Find out which of Star Trek’s alien races you really belong to with our largest ever inter-galactic life guide (well, flowchart)

STAR TREK BEYOND HAS BEAMED INTO CINEMAS SO IT’S TIME FOR JOKERSIDE TO START ITS COUNTDOWN TO THE GREAT SPACE OPERA’S 50TH ANNIVERSARY.  And what better way to start than with you dear explorer of the final frontier! Face it. We’re all cut-price Trill symbiont with a hidden Star Trek race in us – and it’s time to discover what yours is!

While five decades of Star Trek have, bar the odd incident, traversed just the stars of the Milky Way, they’ve uncovered a huge and diverse range of alien races. That variety is exactly what the show’s classic intro anticipated, but of course, those extra-terrestrials have come in guises good and bad.  You’ve no doubt already worked out which member of the intrepid crew of the Enterprise you are… So, once again it’s time to lock coordinates, engage the inertial dampers and discover your inner alien!

Read more…

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